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July 19, 2017  |  by Rachel

Flooring - Part One - Hardwood

We sat down with our designers to ask some questions and to learn more about flooring. As they help our clients walk through many of the decisions that need to be made when it comes to selecting floors, we knew they would be a great source of information on flooring options, current trends and some tips and tricks on making the best choice for your space! Thank you Lee-Ann, Leslie, Lina and Vanessa for your fantastic input. 

We will be breaking this topic up into a few separate posts, and decided to start off our series on flooring with Hardwood Flooring. Hardwood flooring has definitely become the standard for flooring over the last number of years, particularly for use in main living spaces in most new and renovated homes. Hardwood floors can be classic and timeless, yet can also be trend-forward and modern depending on your preferences. There are so many options when it comes to color, grain, width and installation patterns. The variety available means you can create a unique look to suit virtually any style of home!

 
 

Engineered or solid?

When it comes to hardwood people often wonder whether they should choose solid or engineered flooring. While they both have their pros and cons, we generally recommend engineered hardwood for a number of reasons. The primary reason is that it tends to be more stable due to the base it's manufactured on, and as a result there is less expansion and contraction which results in less gaps. Solid flooring is more impacted by weather and moisture levels, and there can also be a limitation to the plank width.

Designer tip: Engineered hardwood can be refinished! Just be aware of the wear layer so you know how much you will be able to sand it down in the future.

Finishes and patterned install:

As a trend, we are seeing more gray, and gray-toned floors, or a white-washed oak finish. A wire brushed finish has also been gaining popularity recently. If you prefer more of a classic look, consider a hand scraped finish in a mid brown tone as a timeless option!

Pinterest and magazines are awash with herringbone or chevron patterned hardwood floors. While this is a beautiful look, keep in mind that installation costs are substantially higher. A great way to get a unique look but at a more reasonable cost is to consider having your flooring installed at an angle instead.

 
 

Designer tip: Darker and shinier floors will show more dirt, pet hair, foot prints, etc. A mid tone color, with more of a matte finish, some variegated pattern and/or some distressing will show less of the everyday wear and tear.

Where to use hardwood:

We are seeing hardwood being used more often throughout the main living spaces in homes, even throughout kitchens to maintain a consistent look. Keep in mind that wood flooring is more susceptible to water damage (ie a dishwasher flooding). If there's a natural area to transition your flooring in your kitchen, you may want to consider using tile to reduce the chance of damage. There are some great products out there that can minimize the transition between different types of flooring.

Hardwood can also be used on stairs to minimize different types of flooring in your space. You can customize the look of your stairs by the type of nosing you choose (the edge of the stair, in either a rounded or square finish) or by a combination of white and wood (ie white risers/wood tread or the opposite). 

More people are choosing hardwood floors for bedrooms as well. Consider adding rugs to keep the space warm and cozy!

Designer Tip: For a seamless look with hardwood, consider heating vent covers that are flush to the floor and match your flooring.

Type of hardwood:

The type of hardwood you choose is going to be largely dependent on your preference to grain and color. The harder the type of wood, the more durable your flooring is going to be. Hickory, oak and maple are all great choices for flooring that will stand up to pets, children and other potential sources of scratching.

 

Thanks for tuning into the first post in our Flooring series! We'll be back soon with our next installment on Tile!

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